What the Heck is a SEER Rating?

If you are considering a new HVAC unit (Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning) you’ll need a way to see beyond all the hype and tell just how efficient different units are. That’s where SEER ratings come in. With the cost of cooling and heating your home throughout the year, homeowners want to have the most efficient units that they can afford. Asking for recommendations for a specific unit can bring about a wide range of different answers.

An HVAC unit’s SEER rating is one of the most important factors to consider when trying to decide on a model. Most likely if you don’t know what a SEER rating is or how it’s used, the acronym can seem mysterious. To help, here’s a basic rundown of what SEER ratings are, how they level the playing field so to speak, and where you can turn to get more information.

Latin descent, blue collar air conditioner repairman working at residential home. He prepares to begin work by gathering appropriate tools and referring to digital tablet.

SEER Ratings Explained

SEER is one of the details provided on those big yellow “EnergyGuide” stickers that you’ll see on things like air conditioners, heaters, and HVAC units and it stands for “Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio”. It’s the ratio that takes the output of the unit over the course of an average season and divides it by the average energy estimated to be used during that same season. The ratio provides you with an idea of how cost-effective it will be to run the unit, since the ratio sums up how much energy it will take to keep your living space comfortable for an entire season.

It’s important to note that the rating represents the unit’s maximum potential efficiency; your actual experience may (and likely will be) at least somewhat less than that potential based on weather conditions and other factors such as routine maintenance. With that in mind, the SEER rating provides a basis for comparing different options and finding the best solution for your home.

Using a SEER Rating

The smallest SEER rating you can legally install in the US as of today is 13 SEER, and 14-15 is more common (and you can go as high as 21). Higher SEER units use less energy to create the output that the unit achieved. This translates to a significant reduction in cost for you. If you are upgrading from a unit that is maybe 10 to 15 years old, you might save as much as 20 to 40 percent on your energy bills because of the higher efficiency of modern units. Using the SEER rating as a guide will help you to maximize that savings.

Also, SEER ratings can help you to compare models from different manufacturers to find the one that provides the best value for you. A unit that’s more expensive up front because it has a notably higher SEER rating than cheaper models may save you money in the long run.

While there are typically limits to how much your budget can handle, using the SEER rating should help you to find the most efficient option from among multiple models and vendors that otherwise seem very similar.

Choosing the Right HVAC Unit

If you still aren’t sure just which HVAC unit you need, don’t be afraid to interview a few professionals. Get in touch with pros that specialize in HVAC sales and installation, as they’ll not only know how to find the most efficient unit within your budget, they’ll know what type of unit is best for the area you live in. Best of all, they’ll be able to deliver and install the unit for you to make sure that everything is done correctly. This is not what I would consider a DIY project!

If you need a recommendation for which local HVAC company to use – CALL me Jeff Howard, your realtor for life. I have companies that have been checked out and I am happy to recommend.

Do you have a need for commercial/industrial/retail buildings or land? Are you ready to buy or sell a home? Do you want a guaranteed cash offer? We can help you with all of that… just call us at 702 SELL NOW or click on this link to my website http://www.702SellNow.com

Choose to have an amazing day….Jeff

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